Optimal vitamin D intake for disease prevention: Guideline

Optimal vitamin D intake for disease prevention: Guideline

Published on :

Author

vitamin D

Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline focuses on supplementation guidance for children, the elderly, pregnant women, and those with pre-diabetes.

The Endocrine Society released its latest clinical practice guideline, earlier this month, on the use of vitamin D for the prevention of disease. ‘Vitamin D for the Prevention of Disease: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline’ focuses on specific age groups and conditions, such as supplementation guidance for children, the elderly, pregnant women, and those with pre-diabetes.

Here are some of the key recommendations: 

      1. Children and adolescents (1-18 years): Daily Vitamin D intake (ranging from 300 to 2000 IU or 7.5 to 50 μg) to prevent rickets and possibly lower respiratory infection risk. 
      2. Adults under 50 years of age: There is no need for routine vitamin D supplementation. The daily Vitamin D supplementation should not exceed the recommended 600 IU (15 μg) limit.
      3. Adults aged 50-74 years: There is no need for routine vitamin D supplementation beyond the recommended intake of 600 IU (15 μg) for 50-70 years and 800 IU (20 μg) for 70+ years. Routine 25(OH) D testing is also not recommended, unless specifically indicated.
      4. Adults 75 and older: The recommended daily Vitamin D supplementation is 400-3333 IU (10-83 μg), averaging 900 IU (23 μg)) to reduce mortality risk, preferring lower daily doses. Routine 25(OH) D testing is not recommended unless indicated.
      5. Pregnant women: Recommend Vitamin D supplementation to lower risks of preeclampsia and adverse birth outcomes, with doses ranging from 600 to 5000 IU (15-125 μg), averaging 2500 IU (63 μg) daily. 
      6. High-risk pre-diabetes: Recommend Vitamin D supplementation alongside lifestyle changes to prevent diabetes progression, with doses ranging from 842 to 7543 IU (21-189 μg), averaging 3500 IU (88 μg) daily.

 

In contrast to previous guidelines that broadly addressed the evaluation, treatment, and prevention of vitamin D deficiency, with an emphasis on the care of patients who are at risk for deficiency, the goal of the latest guidelines is to use vitamin D to lower the risk of disease in individuals without established indications for vitamin D treatment or 25(OH)D testing. You can read the complete guidelines here.

Read More: Explainer: 5 vitamins, besides vitamin D, for optimal bone health

Author